Horse Fighting: Annual games in China

Repost

According to the Chinese Zodiac, 2014 is The Year of the Wood Horse.

– Gameness til the End

Horse fight game held in SW China

2009-02-07 08:05:01 GMT2009-02-07 16:05:01 (Beijing Time)  Xinhua English


Two horses fight against each other during a horse fight game held in Antai Township of Rongshui County, southwest China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Feb. 5, 2009. More than 30 horses took part in in the annual game on Thursday. (Xinhua/Long Tao)


Two horses fight against each other during a horse fight game held in Antai Township of Rongshui County, southwest China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Feb. 5, 2009. More than 30 horses took part in in the annual game on Thursday. (Xinhua/Long Tao)


Two horses fight against each other during a horse fight game held in Antai Township of Rongshui County, southwest China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Feb. 5, 2009. More than 30 horses took part in in the annual game on Thursday. (Xinhua/Long Tao)


Villagers look on as two horses battle with each other in a local horse fighting championship in Rongshui Miao autonomous county, South China’s Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region Thursday February 5, 2009. [CFP]


Villagers look on as two horses battle with each other in a local horse fighting championship in Rongshui Miao autonomous county, South China’s Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region Thursday February 5, 2009. [Asianewsphoto]

Two horses fight against each other during a horse fight game held in Antai Township of Rongshui County, southwest China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Feb. 5, 2009. More than 30 horses took part in in the annual game on Thursday.

China not ready to give up ‘barbaric’ horse fighting

With wild, rolling eyes filled with a mixture of fear and hatred, nostrils flaring, blood already flecking their ragged flanks, two stallions rise on hind legs to fight each other in a dusty arena.

All around them as they bite, kick and snort, an excited, cheering crowd takes bets on who will win. While animal welfare groups yesterday condemned the horse-fighting tradition, celebrated by China’s Miao ethnic group in Rongshui county, Guangxi province, locals pointed out that it had been going on for 500 years.

The fighting, part of the summer Xinhe festival which asks for blessings on newly planted crops, such as corn, sweet potato and soya bean, is even included on some tourist itineraries in South West China.

“It is nothing but barbaric,” said Vivian Farrell, president of the International Fund For Horses, which has led campaigns to ban horse fighting. “It’s cruel and inhumane and I don’t know why they do it.”

While tourist guides tell tales of teams of horses being led into the makeshift arena to the sound of gunfire and a reed pipe band, they fail to mention that the stallions are whipped into a frenzy.

Mrs Farrell said: “First of all they get a mare in season to arouse the stallions, then they take the mare away and the fighting begins. They will rear at each other and kick and bite in the bid to show whose bloodline is superior.

“Sometimes the fights last 10 minutes – sometimes they go on for half an hour. It’s not normally a fight to the death but occasionally animals have to be put down.”

The Miao people, the fifth largest of 56 ethnic groups recognised by the People’s Republic of China, regard the fighting as ‘thrilling, exciting and fascinating.’

One guide explains how two teams of horses, specially selected to be ‘plump, sturdy and energetic,’ are led to the arena and then pitted against each other one by one. They bite each other, turn their hooves and kick the other side heavily. The nervous and fierce fight makes audiences hold their breath or cheer and applaud loudly from time to time,” says the guide.

If one horse falls down or runs away, the other one is declared the winner and another two take their place. The winning horses then fight each other. The last two battle it out to be champion.

While the losers are led away to lick their wounds, the sweat-soaked champion is draped in red while his owner ‘feels very proud for having such a brave and strong steed.’

The mane event: Thousands gather to watch barbaric tradition of horses forced to fight in rural China

By DAILY MAIL REPORTER
PUBLISHED: 16:49 GMT, 9 October 2012
UPDATED: 08:54 GMT, 10 October 2012

With adrenaline pumping, manes whipping and a screaming crowd surrounding them, these two stallions are fighting tooth and hoof as they are pitted against each other in a traditional Chinese horse fight.

The event was arranged to celebrate the end of the autumn harvest in Rongshui County, in the province of Guangxi, and saw the locals gather to watch what animal rights campaigners have called ‘cruel’ and ‘barbaric’.

Horse fights are popular in rural China, as well as in many other parts of Asia, where the ‘sport’ goes back over 500 years.

Fierce fight: One stallion jump to attack another in the traditional event in Rongshui County, China

Fierce fight: One stallion jump to attack another in the traditional event in Rongshui County, China

All about the girl: In order to make the horses aggressive the farmers keep a mare in heat nearby which pits the stallions against each other

All about the girl: In order to make the horses aggressive the farmers keep a mare in heat nearby, pitting the stallions against each other

Crowdpleaser: The gathered watch intently as two young horses go head to head with many having picked a favourite ahead of the battle

Crowdpleaser: The gathered watch intently as two young horses go head to head with many having picked a favourite ahead of the battle

Two stallions are led to a mare in heat, which is taken away when the stallions are aroused, leading them to fight each other.

If the stallions still refuse to fight then organisers use other methods to anger and frighten them such as whipping the creatures or firing guns in the air.

Vivian Farrell, President of the International Fund For Horses, which has led campaigns to ban horse fighting, said: ‘It’s cruel and inhumane and I don’t know why they do it.

‘It is very hard to tackle. They say it’s a tradition. Well, it used to be a tradition to sacrifice children, but we’ve moved on from that.

No sport: The event, held to celebrate the autumn harvest has been part of Chinese rural life for centuries, although human rights campaigners have branded it 'barbaric'

No sport: The event, held to celebrate the autumn harvest has been part of Chinese rural life for centuries, although human rights campaigners have branded it ‘barbaric’

Battle: The two horses fight on their hind legs with teeth bared as the crowd cheers

Battle: The two horses fight on their hind legs with teeth bared as the crowd cheers

‘Sadly it is mostly driven by the Chinese love of gambling, although people get fired up over the blood, gore and intensity of the fighting.’

A spokesperson for PETA added: ‘Torturing these magnificent animals in the name of entertainment is deplorable. Tradition never justifies cruelty and has no place in a civilised society.’

Horse fighting has been outlawed almost worldwide, but it still thrives in countries like the Philippines, Indonesia, South Korea and China.

Moneymakers: It is common for the spectators to bet on the outcome of the horsefights

Moneymakers: It is common for the spectators to bet on the outcome of the horse fights

‘We know the world frowns but it’s an ancient tradition’: Chinese ignore critics to pitch horses into battle at annual festival

By LUCY BUCKLAND
UPDATED: 17:32 GMT, 29 November 2011

Driven mad by lust these two stallions are savagely pitted against each other infront of thousands of spectators.

The result is a bloody fight to the death with biting, kicking and rearing injuries killing some, while other horses simply drop dead from exhaustion.

Officials at the festival in Luizhou, in south China’s Guangxi Zhuang region, have resisted pressure from animal rights groups to stop the event, which is opened by priests.

Bloody battle: These two horses were primed for their fight by an in season mare being paraded infront of them for days, driving them wild with lust

Bloody battle: These two horses were primed for their fight by an in season mare being paraded infront of them for days, driving them wild with lust

They say it is an ancient tradition dating back 500 years with owners training their stallions for months in advance.

Both stallions are first driven mad with lust by an in season mare parading in front of them.

They are then pushed into a pen and must fight for the right to breed with her in front of the baying mob.

Barbaric: These two horses fight to the death as thousands watch in southern China

Barbaric: These two horses fight to the death as thousands watch in southern China

Crowds: Thousands watch as the two horses viciously fight to the death, for entertainment

Crowds: Thousands watch as the two horses viciously fight to the death, for entertainment

‘We know the world frowns on this but for us it is an ancient tradition,’ said one spectator.

This year families watched as a grey stallion tried to fights back, biting out the eyes of the chestnut stallion, but collapses in exhaustion only to be mounted by the confused victor.

And overlooking the bloody showdown, families with children laugh at the result as they gather on the hillside for a grandstand view.

‘We will not stop these contests because they are part of our culture,’ said one trainer.

Decorative dress: Although the horse festival is celebrated, animal rights campaigners have branded it 'barbaric'

Decorative dress: Although the horse festival is celebrated, animal rights campaigners have branded it ‘barbaric’

While the ‘sport’ of horse fighting is enjoyed throughout China, it has been labelled ‘barbaric’ and ‘bloodthirsty’ by animal rights campaigners.

A spokesperson for PETA said: ‘Torturing these magnificent animals in the name of entertainment is deplorable. Tradition never justifies cruelty and has no place in a civilised society.’

Horse fighting has been outlawed almost worldwide, but it still thrives in countries like the Philippines, Indonesia, South Korea and China.




poultry gamefowl chicken gamecock

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s