Boxing Forgotten Goal: A Knockout (or A Kill in Cockfighting)

Just like in cockfighting where the goal is for the gamecock to kill the other with or without weapons, boxing forgotten goal is to knockout the other.

Wikipedia entry for “boxing” states:

Boxing (pugilismprize fighting, or the sweet science) is a combat sport in which two people engage in a contest of strength, reflexes, and endurance by throwing punches at an opponent with the goal of a knockout with gloved hands.

Rules have a hand as to why a knockout become a forgotten goal

Broughton’s rules (1743) introduced the 30 seconds count after a knockdown and padded gloves. Boxers can drop to one knee to have a 30 seconds count.

London Prize Ring rules (1838) retained the 30 seconds count after a knockdown.

Marquess of Queensberry rules (1867) introduced 12(15) rounds of 3 minute each, 1 minute rest, and larger gloves.

As a result of their introduction, bouts became longer and more strategic with greater importance attached to defensive maneuvers such as slipping, bobbing, countering and angling.

The fight is controlled by a referee who works within the ring to judge and control the conduct of the fighters, rule on their ability to fight safely, count knocked-down fighters, and rule on fouls. Up to three judges are typically present at ringside to score the bout and assign points to the boxers, based on punches that connect, defense, knockdowns, and other, more subjective, measures. Because of the open-ended style of boxing judging, many fights have controversial results, in which one or both fighters believe they have been “robbed” or unfairly denied a victory.

A bout in which the predetermined number of rounds passes is decided by the judges, and is said to “go the distance”. The fighter with the higher score at the end of the fight is ruled the winner.

A boxer may win the bout before a decision is reached through a knockout; such bouts are said to have ended “inside the distance”. If a fighter is knocked down during the fight, determined by whether the boxer touches the canvas floor of the ring with any part of their body other than the feet as a result of the opponent’s punch and not a slip, as determined by the referee, the referee begins counting until the fighter returns to his or her feet and can continue. Should the referee count to ten, then the knocked-down boxer is ruled “knocked out” (whether unconscious or not) and the other boxer is ruled the winner by knockout (KO).

A “technical knockout” (TKO) is possible as well, and is ruled by the referee, fight doctor, or a fighter’s corner if a fighter is unable to safely continue to fight, based upon injuries or being judged unable to effectively defend themselves. Many jurisdictions and sanctioning agencies also have a “three-knockdown rule”, in which three knockdowns in a given round result in a TKO.

Boxing may become prestigious again

Boxing will be prestigious again If KNOCKOUT become its GOAL again. No judges needed. And no predetermined number of rounds. The only results will be either a knockout (or technical knockout) or a draw. TKO also includes when a boxer throws in the towel or quits.

Unheard of these days, but common during the early 20th Century in North America, a “newspaper decision (NWS)” might be made after a no decision bout had ended. A “no decision” bout occurred when, by law or by pre-arrangement of the fighters, if both boxers were still standing at the fight’s conclusion and there was no knockout, no official decision was rendered and neither boxer was declared the winner. But this did not prevent the pool of ringside newspaper reporters from declaring a consensus result among themselves and printing a newspaper decision in their publications. Officially, however, a “no decision” bout resulted in neither boxer winning or losing. Boxing historians sometimes use these unofficial newspaper decisions in compiling fight records for illustrative purposes only. Often, media outlets covering a match will personally score the match, and post their scores as an independent sentence in their report.

– Gameness til the End




poultry gamefowl chicken gamecock

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