Missouri Will Soon Join Iowa and Utah To Ban Secret Livestock Video

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Chicken raising, whether it is a hobby operation or a full scale commercial operations, is animal farming and part of the industry of agriculture.

Let’s not forget that cockfighting is a 365 days a year sports… from eggs to the cockpits… feeding, watering, medicating, exercising, and fighting our property… our eggs aka gamecocks… our poultry… our livestock…

We must elect more agriculture concerned individual like:

“Unfortunately we live in a society where these activists are becoming more and more of a problem to agriculture. We cannot afford to allow these groups to target our industry of agriculture in Missouri like they have in Iowa.” Missouri House Representative Casey Guernsey, R-Bethany

“Agriculture as we know it is in danger from outside influences and outside fears.” Missouri House Representative Ed Schieffer, D-Troy

“By trying to protect just a few bad companies we’re ruining it for the legitimate companies and the legitimate producers.” Missouri House Representative Tracy McCreery, an Olivette independent

– Gameness til the End

Missouri House OKs ban on secret livestock videos

Bill would criminalize undercover filming of cattle, poultry operations
5:13 AM, Apr. 18, 2012 Written by Josh Nelson

JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri could become the third state this year to pass a bill cracking down on people who secretly film livestock operations.

The House of Representatives gave initial approval to a bill Tuesday making it a crime to make or distribute a video or audio recording of an agriculture facility without the owner’s consent. The bill also makes it a crime for a potential employee to answer untruthfully if a farm owner asks if the individual is a member of an activist group.

The bill applies only to people who film a video while on private property, such as inside a cattle yard or poultry barn. It does not prevent someone from recording video from public street or a sidewalk.

It passed on a vote of 124 yes and 29 no. All Springfield-area representatives voted in favor of it.

Backers of the measure in Missouri say they hope to avoid the problems seen in Iowa, where several animal rights groups have used hidden cameras to produce videos of alleged animal abuse inside livestock operations.

Lawmakers in Iowa and Utah passed bills banning the practice. Animal rights groups have dubbed the measures “ag gag” laws.

“Unfortunately we live in a society where these activists are becoming more and more of a problem to agriculture,” said Rep. Casey Guernsey, R-Bethany, who is sponsoring the bill in Missouri. “We cannot afford to allow these groups to target our industry of agriculture in Missouri like they have in Iowa.”

Guernsey, who raises cattle on a family farm, said he has not heard of a situation yet of a hidden camera video being produced at a Missouri livestock operation.

The measure also created a divide between urban Democrats, who expressed worries about food safety, and rural lawmakers of both parties, who said the measure would protect farmers and producers.

“Agriculture as we know it is in danger from outside influences and outside fears,” said Rep. Ed Schieffer, D-Troy.

Opponents say the bill is an overreaction by large farm groups and that it will protect bad actors at the expense of consumers.

“By trying to protect just a few bad companies we’re ruining it for the legitimate companies and the legitimate producers,” said Rep. Tracy McCreery, an Olivette independent.

McCreery and other opponents say the ban on videos will mean customers will not be able to find out if their food is produced in a safe or humane manner.

“They just simply don’t want consumers to see what is happening on these large industrial farms,” said Matt Dominguez, the public policy director for the Human Society of the United States’ Farm Animal Protection Campaign.

Dominguez said the videos have helped to reveal several incidents of abuse or unacceptable practices by farm workers around the country.

Guernsey’s bill applies to a number of agriculture operations, including packing plants, cattle and poultry barns, and exhibitions. It will apply to trucks and trailers used to transport animals.

The proposal creates two new crimes called agriculture production facility fraud and agriculture production facility interference. The penalties for those offenses range from up to six months in jail to four years in prison and fines of up to $1,000 for each offense.

It also increases existing penalties for first-degree trespassing and false impersonation.

The House must vote on the bill one more time before it heads to the Senate.




poultry gamefowl chicken gamecock

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